I stopped getting my hair dyed at the salon in 2008 after I found out about all the awful ingredients that hair dyes contain. And, for me, it was especially important to keep my body clean of chemicals after going through the Nutrition Response Testing program at Covenant Natural Health Care because I am of child-bearing age.

According to Dr. Mercola, "Your scalp has a very rich blood supply that is more than capable of transporting the toxins in hair dyes throughout your entire body."

It has taken me a couple years now to find an all-natural hair color that works well and is pretty after applied. The color comes from SabaBotanical and the base of the formula is henna. It is a nontoxic herbal hair color.  No ammonia; No peroxide; No harsh chemicals; No synthetic dyes, no PPD.  It is totally PPD free. The other thing that is nice is that it isn't that expensive at $7.50/100grams.

As with anything, there are pros and cons.

Pros:
• Healthy for hair and body
• Non-toxic
• Henna makes hair soft and shiny
• Covers grey hair
• Inexpensive

Cons:
• To keep the grey covered, you will have to color your hair about every 2-3 weeks (depending mostly on how often you shampoo.
• The color comes as a powder that you have to mix with boiling water to make a paste that gets applied to the hair. Application can be messy if you have long hair. I highly recommend cutting a large garbage  bag open and putting it under you as you apply the color for easy clean up.
• Color has to stay on the hair for at least an hour.

For me, the pros totally outweigh the cons because I am avoiding the chemicals that are found in traditional hair dyes. I don't like that it's a little messy, but I do like the final result. I do think it's the best henna product on the market (I've tried several) and the best 100% natural hair color I've tried.

If you've been using chemicals on your hair, you will want to contact the company prior to applying it to your hair to make sure any chemicals from previous dyes will not interfere with the henna. And, from what I understand henna can be difficult to get out if you don't like it and want to switch back to a hair dye that contains chemicals.

So really, it comes down to how many chemicals do you want to avoid putting in your body.